Caption from the paper: Experimental design and results of intention discrimination. (A) Example video frames of grasp-to-pour and grasp-to-place actions produced by TD and ASD children. Each video began with reach onset and ended with the contact between the hand and the bottle. (B) Trial design of the intention discrimination task. (C) Schematic representation of the experimental design. (D) Trial-averaged intention discrimination performance (fraction correct) for each observer group and observed action. Histograms represent mean ± SEM across participants. ns indicates P > 0.05. *P < 0.05.

New Research: Intersecting kinematic encoding and readout of intention in autism

Research from Carnegie Mellon studies intention reading from TD and ASD, namely how both populations both read and encode this kinematic data.

 

See the article with the link to the full paper here

Caption from the paper: Experimental design and results of intention discrimination. (A) Example video frames of grasp-to-pour and grasp-to-place actions produced by TD and ASD children. Each video began with reach onset and ended with the contact between the hand and the bottle. (B) Trial design of the intention discrimination task. (C) Schematic representation of the experimental design. (D) Trial-averaged intention discrimination performance (fraction correct) for each observer group and observed action. Histograms represent mean ± SEM across participants. ns indicates P > 0.05. *P < 0.05.
Experimental design and results of intention discrimination. (A) Example video frames of grasp-to-pour and grasp-to-place actions produced by TD and ASD children. Each video began with reach onset and ended with the contact between the hand and the bottle. (B) Trial design of the intention discrimination task. (C) Schematic representation of the experimental design. (D) Trial-averaged intention discrimination performance (fraction correct) for each observer group and observed action. Histograms represent mean ± SEM across participants. ns indicates P > 0.05. *P < 0.05.

Younger siblings of children with ASD are known to be at higher risk for developing language delays. The Infancy Studies Lab at Rutgers University-Newark has created an engaging interactive acoustic experience with the aim of helping baby siblings of children with ASD develop better pre-language skills known to be important for optimal and efficient language acquisition. Watch this short video to learn more about how to participate in this exciting, innovative research study.